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From the category archives:

The Scene

Massey Hall at 122

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Each year, as the moments and memories pile up, we like to take a minute to recognize and thank the incredible and dedicated staff, crew, patrons, artists, and community of leaders who help make Massey Hall so magical – night after night.

Over the past year, among countless happenings, we welcomed over 200,000 people through its famous red doors including more than 1800 students from 44 different GTA schools and community groups at Share the Music workshops and CONTINUE READING >

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Jazz Stories at Massey Hall

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Here at Soundboard, it’s difficult to drop the word ‘jazz’ without referring to a particular night in Massey Hall history: May 15, 1953, the night of what’s come to be known – and, occasionally, the name under which the recording of that night has been released – The Greatest Jazz Concert Ever.
The Quintet, as the band became known, comprised five of jazz’s top talents, gathered for the first and only time: Charlie “Bird” Parker (sax), Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet), Bud Powell (piano), Charles Mingus (bass) and Max Roach (drums). This legendary concert has, in the decades since, done much to remind us that you can’t spell “history” without “story.”
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Remembering Joe Cocker

Joe Cocker performed on the Massey Hall stage on numerous occasions and as his many fans know, he was an enormous talent. It was as though the soul of his song was erupting from his body. His performances were explosive in a kind of honest and authentic way.

When I read that he died yesterday I called my friend Craig Martin, the Music Director for Classic Albums Live, who I knew was a fan. He told me that his first introduction to Joe was via Saturday Night Live – with Belushi alongside him mimicking his moves. How hilarious the bit was and how it gave you a look into Joe’s head space CONTINUE READING >

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spencer-chalkboardI used to spend a lot of time down at the local market when I was a teen. I would do all the things a teen my age (the age of a teen) would do. I would sit with my friends, spend my hard earned pennies on apple fritters and of course, like most boys my age, I would ride skateboards.

I never had a skateboard to write home about. It was nothing special is what I mean, at least not to anyone aside from myself. I remember all the other kids talking brands and hardware. How much money everything was, and how it became obsolete in the blink of an eye. I was simple and I came from a simple home. My skateboard was home made. A thick, heavy piece of wood with a sand paper top and second hand wheels. I felt at times, like it was a barrier between my friends and I, however, I loved that damn thing. It got me from point A to point B and it never had a problem doing so.

One hot day in the middle of august I pushed my way down to the market and CONTINUE READING >

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rth award

Every two years, the Roy Thomson Hall Award of Recognition is presented to an individual, corporation or ensemble that has made an outstanding contribution to the musical life of Toronto. Yesterday at the annual Mayors’ Luncheon, hosted by the Toronto Arts Council Foundation at Arcadian Court, our President & CEO Charles Cutts announced this years recipient: Canadian Hip Hop pioneer, Michie Mee.

The biennial award, established in 1984 by the Volunteer Committee of Roy Thomson Hall to thank the community that supported the conception and building of the new concert hall, was originally an honourary award. Since 2002, The Toronto Arts Council Foundation has managed the award process and the award has also come with a $10,000 cash prize. Congratulations Michie Mee on this well deserved accolade and to all those nominated who make our city so inspiring, we thank you.

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